Opioid Epidemic Statistics: Key Findings From 2013-2018

//Opioid Epidemic Statistics: Key Findings From 2013-2018

Opioid Epidemic Statistics: Key Findings From 2013-2018

Many people use opioids to help with their chronic pain management. While these prescription medications can help some people with pain, on the whole, the research shows that these medications or prescribed too often, and can lead to dangerous effects on health. Here’s what research from the last five years has found about opioid epidemic statistics.

What are opioids?

Opioids are analgesic drugs that have generally been used to treat and manage chronic pain, mimicking the natural opioids created by the body to help regulate stress and pain. Opioids bind to opioid receptors and activate them.

Prescription and illicit opioids are much more potent than our body’s natural opioids, however. They cause the receptors to overproduce and flood the brain and central nervous system with opioids. This process creates intense feelings of pain relief, relaxation, and sedation, as well as setting the stage for opioid misuse and addiction.

You can find more about the recent research into opioid discoveries and alternatives in our opioid research post for 2018.

Key findings in opioid epidemic statistics

The following are statistics about the prescribing, use, and overdose rates of opioids in the U.S. These statistics were gathered from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the National Institute on Drug Abuse, the Kaiser Family Foundation, and the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration.

  • In 2016, 63,632 people in the U.S. died from drug overdoses, two-thirds of those deaths involved a prescription of illicit opioid
  • Overdose deaths have been steadily increasing across all races, ages, genders, and socioeconomic statuses
  • The most common drugs involved in prescription opioid overdose deaths include Methadone, Oxycodone (such as OxyContin®), and Hydrocodone (such as Vicodin®)
  • Overdose deaths caused by fentanyl and other synthetic opiates have doubled since 2015
  • The total economic burden of prescription opioid misuse in the United States is $78.5 billion a year, including the costs of healthcare, lost productivity, addiction treatment, and criminal justice involvement

Opioid prescription statistics from 2013-2018

The epidemic starts with prescriptions. Here’s what we know.

  • 4 million people in the U.S. misused prescription pain medicine in 2016 and 2017
  • While only 5% of those who misuse prescription pain medicine will transition to using heroin or synthetic opioids, approximately 80% of heroin users misused prescription pain medicine first
  • People in the U.S. represent 99.7% of the world’s hydrocodone consumption
  • In 2016, 16% of U.S. counties filled enough prescriptions for every person to have at least one
  • There has been a 22% decrease in opioid prescriptions nationally between 2013 and 2017
  • In 2015, fewer than one-fourth of individuals who were dependent on opioids received appropriate treatment

Opioid overdose statistics from 2013-2018

One of the most alarming facts of the opioid epidemic is how misuse and abuse of these medications can lead to death. Here’s what we know.

  • More than 115 people die every day in the United States as the result of an opioid overdose
  • More than 46 people die every day from overdoses involving prescription opioids
  • 40% of all opioid overdose deaths in 2016 involved a prescription opioid
  • 1 in 5 people in the U.S. say they know someone who has died from a prescription opioid overdose
  • The prescription opioid-related overdose death rate increased by 10.6% in 2016
  • The heroin-related overdose death rate increased by 19.5% in 2016
  • Fentanyl overdose deaths have risen by 540% since 2013
  • There were nearly 19,500 fentanyl related overdose deaths in 2016, compared to 3,000 just three years earlier

Opioid statistics by age, gender, and race

It’s important to look past the general statistics to see who is most affected by these medications so we can direct preventative education and care their way. Here’s what we know.

  • Overdose rates from prescription opioids were highest among people aged 25 to 54 years
  • In 2016, the largest increase in opioid overdose deaths was in males between the ages of 25 and 44
  • The rate of prescription opioid overdose deaths among men was 6.2 per 100,000 people and the rate among women was 4.3 in 2016
  • In 2015, approximately 23% of black adults used opioids, which for the first time was equal to 23% of white adults suggesting that the racial gap in opioid prescriptions is narrowing
  • The opioid overdose death rate for African Americans surged from 6.3 to 10 deaths per 100,000 in 2016

Opioid statistics by state

You’ll find state-by-state statistics at the end of this post. However, the following gives an overview of some of the key findings.

  • From 2016 to 2017, opioid overdoses actually increased by 30% in 45 states
  • The Midwest, in particular, saw a 70% increase in opioid-related overdoses during that time
  • Alabama had the highest rate of opioid prescriptions in the U.S., at 121 prescriptions per 100 people
  • 66 of 75 Arkansas counties had opioid prescription rates higher than the national average in 2016
  • There has been a 74% increase of opioid deaths in Arizona between 2012 and 2016
  • Delaware had the country’s highest high-dosage prescription rate from 2014 to 2016

How we’re responding to these opioid epidemic statistics

In 2013, only 16% of people in the U.S. believed that the United States was making progress in its efforts to reduce prescription drug abuse.

In 2017, the federal government declared the opioid epidemic a public health emergency, freeing up much-needed resources to help combat the problem. Congress has also passed the 21st Century Cures Act, providing a billion dollars over the next two years to states for opioid prevention and treatment programs.

The U.S. Department of Health and Human Service along with the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) developed a five-point strategy to address the crisis:

  • Improve access to prevention, treatment, and recovery support services to prevent the health, social, and economic consequences associated with opioid addiction and to enable individuals to achieve long-term recovery
  • Target the availability and distribution of overdose-reversing drugs to ensure the broad provision of these drugs to people likely to experience or respond to an overdose, with a particular focus on targeting high-risk populations
  • Strengthen public health data reporting and collection to improve the timeliness and specificity of data and to inform a real-time public health response as the epidemic evolves
  • Support cutting-edge research that advances our understanding of pain and addiction, leads to the development of new treatments, and identifies effective public health interventions to reduce opioid-related health harms
  • Advance the practice of pain management to enable access to high-quality, evidence based pain care that reduces the burden of pain for individuals, families, and society while also reducing the inappropriate use of opioids and opioid-related harms

Opioid Epidemic Statistics: Key Findings From 2013-2018 | PainDoctor.com

Get help

If you or someone you care about is currently battling with an addiction to opioids, prescription or otherwise, there is help. Call the opiate helpline at 1-877-522-1145. Find help or treatment at the SAMHSA website.

PainDoctor.com empathizes with the burden that chronic pain carries and recognizes that sometimes opiates feel like that only thing that works. We encourage patients to incorporate lifestyle changes, minimally invasive procedures, and complementary therapies into their pain management routine before using opioids for pain relief.

For those patients who have exhausted all other options and may benefit from opioids, we have a 12-Step Opioid Checklist to ensure patient safety.

For more information about opioid medications, or to talk to a pain specialist about other treatment options, click the button below. A certified pain doctor can help you find relief from your pain. You can find a pain doctor in your area by clicking the button below or looking for one in your area by using the tips here: https://paindoctor.com/pain-management-doctors/.

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State statistics for opioids

The following gives state-by-state opioid epidemic statistics.

Alabama

  • Opioid overdose deaths in 2016: 7,343
  • +3.2% increase from 2015-2016
  • Alabama had the highest rate of opioid prescribing in the country at 121 prescriptions per 100 people

Alaska

  • Opioid overdose deaths in 2016: 94
  • +5.0% increase from 2015-2016

Arizona

  • Opioid overdose deaths in 2016: 769
  • +6.8% increase from 2015-2016
  • There has been a 74% increase of opioid deaths in Arizona between 2012 and 2016

Arkansas

  • Opioid overdose deaths in 2016: 169
  • +1.4% increase from 2015-2016
  • 66 of 75 Arkansas counties had opioid prescribing rates higher than the national average in 2016

California

  • Opioid overdose deaths in 2016: 2,012
  • -0.9% decrease from 2015-2016

Colorado

  • Opioid overdose deaths in 2016: 536
  • +7.8% increase from 2015-2016

Connecticut

  • Opioid overdose deaths in 2016: 971
  • +24% increase from 2015-2016

Delaware

  • Opioid overdose deaths in 2016: 154
  • +40% increase from 2015-2016
  • Delaware had the country’s highest high-dosage prescription rate in 2014-2016

District of Columbia

  • Opioid overdose deaths in 2016: 209
  • +108.6% increase from 2015-2016
  • Opioid overdose deaths in Washington, DC more than doubled from 2014 to 2016

Florida

  • Opioid overdose deaths in 2016: 2,798
  • +46.3% increase from 2015-2016
  • Florida is among 6 states that declared opioid abuse a public health emergency in 2017

Georgia

  • Opioid overdose deaths in 2016: 918
  • +4.7% increase from 2015-2016

Hawaii

  • Opioid overdose deaths in 2016: 77
  • +13.3% increase from 2015-2016

Idaho

  • Opioid overdose deaths in 2016: 119
  • +7.0 increase from 2015-2016

Illinois

  • Opioid overdose deaths in 2016: 1,947
  • +34% increase from 2015-2016

Indiana

  • Opioid overdose deaths in 2016: 794
  • +23.1% increase from 2015-2016

Iowa

  • Opioid overdose deaths in 2016: 183
  • +2.9% increase from 2015-2016

Kansas

  • Opioid overdose deaths in 2016: 146
  • -5.9% decrease from 2015-2016

Kentucky

  • Opioid overdose deaths in 2016: 989
  • +12% increase from 2015-2016

Louisiana

  • Opioid overdose deaths in 2016: 346
  • +14.7% increase from 2015-2016
  • Louisiana is the fifth highest prescriber of painkillers, with 98.1 prescriptions per 100 people

Maine

  • Opioid overdose deaths in 2016: 301
  • +35.4% increase from 2015-2016
  • Maine is the fourth highest prescribing state for long-acting and extended-release opioids

Maryland

  • Opioid overdose deaths in 2016: 1,821
  • +58.9% increase from 2015-2016

Massachusetts

  • Opioid overdose deaths in 2016: 1,821
  • +28.4% increase from 2015-2016

Michigan

  • Opioid overdose deaths in 2016: 1,762
  • +19.6% increase from 2015-2016
  • In 2016, 11 million opioid prescriptions were written in Michigan, about 1.1 per resident

Minnesota

  • Opioid overdose deaths in 2016: 396
  • +17.9% increase from 2015-2016

Mississippi

  • Opioid overdose deaths in 2016: 180
  • -1.6% decrease from 2015-2016

Missouri

  • Opioid overdose deaths in 2016: 914
  • +31.8% increase from 2015-2016

Montana

  • Opioid overdose deaths in 2016: 42
  • -15.2% decrease from 2015-2016

Nebraska

  • Opioid overdose deaths in 2016: 44
  • -7.2% decrease from 2015-2016

Nevada

  • Opioid overdose deaths in 2016: 408
  • +6.4% increase from 2015-2016

New Hampshire

  • Opioid overdose deaths in 2016: 437
  • +13.7% increase from 2015-2016

New Jersey

  • Opioid overdose deaths in 2016: 1,409
  • +42.3% increase from 2015-2016

New Mexico

  • Opioid overdose deaths in 2016: 349
  • -0.4% decrease from 2015-2016

New York

  • Opioid overdose deaths in 2016: 2,450
  • +32.4% increase from 2015-2016

North Carolina

  • Opioid overdose deaths in 2016: 1,505
  • +24.7% increase from 2015-2016

North Dakota

  • Opioid overdose deaths in 2016: 54
  • +23.3% increase from 2015-2016

Ohio

  • Opioid overdose deaths in 2016: 3,613
  • +30.8% increase from 2015-2016

Oklahoma

  • Opioid overdose deaths in 2016: 444
  • +13.2% increase from 2015-2016
  • Oklahoma is the third highest prescriber of long-acting and extended-release opioids

Oregon

  • Opioid overdose deaths in 2016: 312
  • -0.8% decrease from 2015-2016

Pennsylvania

  • Opioid overdose deaths in 2016: 2,235
  • +44.1% increase from 2015-2016

Rhode Island

  • Opioid overdose deaths in 2016: 279
  • +9.2% increase from 2015-2016

South Carolina

  • Opioid overdose deaths in 2016: 678
  • +15.3% increase from 2015-2016

South Dakota

  • Opioid overdose deaths in 2016: 42
  • 0% change from 2015-2016

Tennessee

  • Opioid overdose deaths in 2016: 1,186
  • +10.4% increase from 2015-2016
  • In 2016, Tennessee was the third highest prescriber of opioids

Texas

  • Opioid overdose deaths in 2016: 1,375
  • +7.4% increase from 2015-2016

Utah

  • Opioid overdose deaths in 2016: 466
  • -4.3% decrease from 2015-2016

Vermont

  • Opioid overdose deaths in 2016: 101
  • +32.9% increase from 2015-2016

Virginia

  • Opioid overdose deaths in 2016: 1,130
  • +34.7% increase from 2015-2016

Washington

  • Opioid overdose deaths in 2016: 692
  • -1.4% decrease from 2015-2016
  • More Washingtonians died from opioid overdose than from car accidents in 2015

West Virginia

  • Opioid overdose deaths in 2016: 435
  • +25.3% increase from 2015-2016
  • West Virginia had the country’s highest drug-overdose death rate per population in 2015

Wisconsin

  • Opioid overdose deaths in 2016: 865
  • +24.5% increase from 2015-2016
  • More Wisconsinites died from opioid overdoses than from car accidents in 2015

Wyoming

  • Opioid overdose deaths in 2016: 50
  • +7.3% increase from 2015-2016

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By | 2018-11-23T12:07:51+00:00 November 28th, 2018|Tags: , , |0 Comments

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