What is De Quervains Tenosynovitis, Dupuytrens Contracture?

De Quervains TenosynovitisDe Quervains tenosynovitis is a painful condition that affects the tendons of the hand, specifically those on the side of the thumb. Pain is generally felt when making a fist, gripping an object, or turning the wrist. This conditions limits any activities where the wrist and hand are being used and those who suffer from De Quervain’s tenosynovitis may find that they are unable to go about their daily activities such as washing dishes, working on a computer, lifting their children, or running a vacuum cleaner.

When you are suffering from a condition of the hand or wrist, your life can be badly altered. It may be difficult to complete simple tasks such as picking up or gripping a coffee cup, typing on a computer, knitting or other hobbies.

De Quervains Tenosynovitis, Dupuytrens Contracture Treatments

Treatment for De Quervain’s tenosynovitis usually involves a combination of icing the affected area, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) such as ibuprofen or aspirin, the use of an immobilizing splint, and corticosteroid injections to the affected area. Rarely is the case so advanced that surgery is required, but may be suggested after repeated corticosteroid injections have failed to provide relief. Patients with De Quervain’s tenosynovitis usually see an excellent outcome once they begin treatment measures.

Dupuytren’s contracture is a fairly common condition. Symptoms include a thickening and subsequent contraction of the fascia in the hand, which results in a formation of scar tissue and in a curling or flexion of the fingers. The cause of Dupuytren’s contracture is largely unknown, but there has been a noted link between Dupuytren’s contracture and smoking, seizure disorders such as epilepsy, and diabetes. There may also be a familial link showing Dupuytren’s contracture to be genetic.

Treatment depends on the severity of the condition. If it is mild, pain and contracture symptoms can be alleviated by applying heat to the affected area and utilizing specific stretching exercises. Corticosteroid injections may alleviate some of the inflammation and help with pain as well. In extreme cases, surgery may be indicated. The scar tissue can be removed, and this will release the contraction on the hand and fingers, which will restore flexibility and function to the affected hand.

References

MedicineNet.com

Waldman, S.D. (2007) Pain Management, Volume I. 324-325. Philadelphia: Saunders Elsevier